Blog Archives

The Red Wheelbarrow – A Creative Reading

This is another example of RANDOM, YET CREATIVE for me. Since high school, this super short and dorky poem has caught my attention. William Carlos Williams wrote this poem about chicken, wheelbarrows, and rain.

More importantly, the making of this video for me was a significant part of my creativity therapy. Enjoy the randomness!

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Jabberwocky – A Creative Reading

Yes, I’m a fan of Lewis Carol’s Alice in Wonderland books, which includes the poem about the Jabberwock, a fearsome creature. However, a young fighter goes out and kills this creature with a sword, and brings back the head to his father.

This was one of the more enjoyable, goofy, nonsensical projects I did. The creativity used here was good medicine for me!

Create Something (aka the Power of Creativity Therapy!)

A couple of blog posts of mine thus far have been videos of spoken word, of poetry. Now, mind you, I’m not a poetically minded guy. I can’t write poetry to save my life, and I really wouldn’t want to if I could. But while pursuing my English degree I was exposed to enough variety of poetry that I learned to appreciate the scope and depth of emotion that poetry can tap into.

When I first went through my divorce, I experienced such a depth of despair and depression, that I hardly enjoyed anything. There was nothing that could reach inside and help me navigate and make sense of these overwhelming feelings. Until a friend of mine suggested I get creative.

I came to understand from several sources that there is a significant healing quality found in the act of creating something. When depressed, when divorced, creativity must be seen as a life preserver. It was for me, anyway.

I had purchased a MacBook Pro, primarily to help with my editing, writing, and voiceover business. Also, though, as I began to explore the various applications available to me for movie-making and music-creating, I discovered an amazing avenue of healing!

I began experimenting with dramatic poetry reading, making commercials for various groups, and sending goofy video postcards to friends. As a seminary student, I even experimented with putting some of my teaching on video.

I would spend hours on this stuff, tweaking, revamping, laughing, crying, and sharing with friends. Although I eventually began taking antidepressants, one significant alternative drug that impacted my life for good was the drug called “creativity.” ¬†I found myself coming out of my shell a bit. I was able to produce things that were cathartic and beneficial, and other things that were just plain dorky. No matter.

Something inside my brain, no matter how temporary, would stop focusing on my despair and instead would focus on producing something that was fun, funny, meaningful, or just plain random. The pain that I was feeling was much like a HUGE bruise on my soul. And, like bruises we get on our skin, bruises hurt like crazy if you keep touching them. When we are hurting so deeply while going through trauma (like divorce, death, etc), we frequently focus on our hurts, our wounds, our pain. We keep pushing the bruise because we think about it all the time. ¬†However, when we divert our attention to something creative, we stop, even if it’s just for a moment, pushing on the bruise. Instead, we focus on something beautiful, something meaningful.

Some ideas –

*Write a book

*Write a blog

*Keep a journal

*Take an art class

*Take up swing dancing

*Try something artistic and physical, like Poi

*Buy a camera and try photography

*Learn an instrument

*Get out in nature – learn astronomy or bird-watching

*Try ice sculpting

*Learn to cook, especially the manly art of grilling

*Learn how to do woodworking

*Take a geocaching course

*etc etc etc

So, your turn.

******What kind of creative things are you even remotely interested in? And, what’s your plan to implement at least ONE of those creative outlets? Let me know!******

Carrion Comfort – Gerrard Manley Hopkins

Here’s another dramatic reading of a poem I put together a couple of years ago. The speaker in the poem discloses how he came so close to despair, but fought back and resisted depression’s strong pull. The speaker also wrestles with the role God may have played in the difficulties he encountered. While the speaker is far from making a solid conclusion about God’s harsh treatment, it seems as though he begins to see that the difficulties he faced were, somehow, for his own good.

I can certainly relate to this. I was on the brink when I was going through my separation and divorce. Despair was the meal du’jour. However, as I have grown through the experience, I have taken note that I have certainly become a stronger, better, smarter, and more compassionate man because of it.

Enjoy!

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening

This is my favorite Robert Frost poem. Not only did its message of “keep pushing on, in spite of the darkness you’re in” keep my chin up during the darkest days post-divorce, it was an opportunity for me to find a creative outlet.

This dramatic reading was my first video production ever, and I was glad to find an avenue of enjoyment.

I hope that the words of this poem can inspire you, AND I hope that you can find some sort of creative outlet for yourself as you find yourself in some dark times.